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EARTHQUAKES IN DIVERS PLACES: Earthquake strikes US: California, Oklahoma, Texas and Nebraska hit in quick succession

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EARTHQUAKES IN DIVERS PLACES: Earthquake strikes US: California, Oklahoma, Texas and Nebraska hit in quick succession
LATEST QUAKE UPDATE VIDEOS WITHIN

 

A STRING of powerful earthquakes have rocked the west and central US with several of them hitting near to the dreaded RING OF FIRE.

Some eight earthquakes have rocked the United States in quick succession, all of which have taken place on April 9.
The strongest of the earthquakes, and also the most recent, came in Perry, Oklahoma, when a 4.3 magnitude tremor hit the central US state.

However, there have been no reports of damage to buildings in the area.
People took to social media to share their experience, with one writing: “Another earthquake in Oklahoma, shaking us awake just now!”
Other people share similar views, with Twitter user Arianna saying that she believes this is a sign that a bigger earthquake is coming.
She wrote: “All these little earthquakes just leading up to the big earthquake soon that destroys us”.
Since midnight, there have also been earthquakes in Alaska, Nebraska, Texas and three in California.
Both California and Alaska sit on the deadly Ring of Fire – the largest and most active fault line in the world, stretching from New Zealand, all around the east coast of Asia, over to Canada and the USA and all the way down to the southern tip of South America – which causes more than 90 percent of the world’s earthquakes.
Also in California sits the San Andreas fault, where two huge plates meet.
This has also caused many earthquakes over the years, including the recent 5.3 magnitude tremor striking just off the Pacific coast on April 6, rattling Santa Barbara and Los Angeles.
Researchers believe that the San Andreas fault is overdue the ‘Big One’ – a potentially catastrophic earthquake which could cause widespread destruction in the southwest of the US.
Last year, Robert Graves, a research geophysicist at the USGS, said that the Big One could be overdue by 10 years.
He told Raw Story: “The San Andreas fault in southern California last had a major quake in 1857 (magnitude 7.9).
“Studies that have dated previous major offsets along the fault trace show that there have been about 10 major quakes over the past 1,000-2,000 years.
“The average time between these quakes is about 100-150 years.”

 

 

The San Andreas runs through CaliforniaThere is a 1-in-20 chance of Thursday’s quake leading to a bigger one in the next few weeks, John Vidale, director of the Southern California Earthquake Center at USC told the Los Angeles Times.
He said: “A 5.3 could be damaging if it was right under our feet.
“It’s right on the edge of being an earthquake that could be dangerous.It’s a reminder that we need to be ready in the future.”

 

 

 

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Project Black Star Update…………..

 

 

 

The ice train cometh

LinkInSnow

December 24, 2015

Up all night to keep you running in the morning 
Santa won’t the only one pulling an overnighter tonight. Link light rail crews will be up all night tonight running “Ice Trains” so you can get where you need to go tomorrow morning. With forecasts calling for frigid temperatures comes the possibility of ice forming on the overhead lines that power our light rail trains. That’s not a good thing. Ice on the wires can interfere with power transmission to the trains.

Ice trains and ice cutters
Light rail trains normally end passenger service at 1 a.m. but tonight and any other night when circumstances warrant, we’ll keep trains running all night to keep ice from forming on the lines. No, passengers can’t ride these special Ice Trains.  During heavy snows (a rarity here in the lowlands), this also keeps snow and ice from building up on the tracks. The trains out running all night are equipped with heated pantographs (the part of the train that touches the overhead power lines) that helps melt any ice on the wires.

During extreme winter weather, we will also attach an “ice cutter” to the pantograph. In that case, the ice cutter utilizes a standard carbon strip which employs an extra piece of brass that runs at a right angle against the overhead lines to help cut through any ice that may have formed.

Switch heaters and shovels on the ground
Winter weather preparation doesn’t stop with ice trains. All electric switches in the Sound Transit Operations and Maintenance Facility yard and strategic locations on the main train line are also equipped with special heaters to keep them from freezing up and locking in place overnight. Every weekday morning we deploy 15 trains onto the mainline and it’s important to keep those switches free.

Our last defense against Mother Nature comes from good old manual labor – crews out with shovels and salt doing their best to keep the train platforms safe and clear. We appreciate the hard work that goes on behind the scenes as we wait for trains on cold winter mornings and hope you will too next time you’re headed out to catch a train after a long, cold night.

Happy holidays from all of us at Sound Transit!



Rider Community

High Wind Warnings issued for 60 mph gusts in Seattle Tuesday

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SEATTLE — It’s turning into a “November to remember” for storms but the one coming up might end up being the first one that comes to mind when all is said and done.

A powerful frontal system is just starting to push inland, starting a 24-30 hour period very stormy weather around Western Washington, complete with heavy rain, flooding potential, massive mountain snows and then, of course, the much-talked-about windstorm for Tuesday.

This evening and tonight will be marked by heavy rains for the lowlands and significant snows in the mountains. A Winter Storm Warning is in effect through 4 a.m. for 1-2 feet in the high mountain passes, including Stevens Pass, and Paradise Ranger Station (closer to 2 feet possible there) while Snoqualmie Pass could see 8-12 inches. It will be windy overnight as well in the lowlands with gusts in the 25-40 mph range, but it’s just the appetizer.
The Wind Forecast:

The main event comes Tuesday morning when an intense cold front sweeps through the region, creating a large difference in pressure across the state — a recipe for very strong winds as the front approaches and passes by. In addition, the way the storm system is aligned and the path it’s travelling will combine to send a surge of westerly winds chasing after the front, for a second round of severe winds that might even top the first round.

A High Wind Warning is in effect for much of Western Washington Tuesday, including the greater Seattle and Puget Sound/Bremerton Metro areas, from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. The High Wind Warning also covers the Eastside/Cascade foothills, the Strait of Juan de Fuca/northern Olympic Peninsula, Kitsap County, and the coast.

In a slight nuance, a lesser Wind Advisory is in effect for southwestern Washington and the far North South areas of Skagit, Whatcom and San Juan Counties. Winds are still expected to gust as high as 50-55 mph, but a High Wind Warning requires a forecast of 58 mph gusts or better. And 50-55 mph winds are still capable of damage.

Southwest winds will pick up in mid-late morning gusting to 25-40 mph, then increase in gusts to as high as 50-60 mph in the midday hours out of the southwest, then a renewed surge of wind from the west in the early-to-mid afternoon hours, especially along the Strait of Juan de Fuca into Island and Snohomish County, plus a swath of potentially damaging west wind is likely from about Hoquiam/Aberdeen across essentially the US 12/SR-8 corridor into Thurston and Pierce Counties, including Tacoma and the suburbs like Gig Harbor, Graham, Puyallup and Bonney Lake. Downtown Seattle and the central Seattle-Bellevue core tends to be shielded a bit from the west wind thanks to the Olympics, but you’ll have had plenty of wind from the first southerly wind round.

Boaters need to take special precautions as well, especially in the Strait of Juan de Fuca where marine forecasters have issued a Storm Warning for Tuesday for gusts in the waters of 60-70 mph.
These wind speeds are certainly enough to cause widespread power outages and tree damage, so take precautions now for potential power outages. We have a Western Washington windstorm guide at komonews.com/windstorm.
The Flood Forecast:

In addition to the wind, we’re looking at another heavy rain event. All the snow in the Cascades will change to rain early Tuesday morning with another 5-8 inches of rain possible during the day, with isolated spots getting even more. With the rivers just barely in their banks from the last flooding rains over the weekend, it won’t take much to create a renewed round of flooding. Plus this time, instead of an extended 2-day rain event, the rain is expected to fall in a 12-18 hour period, making for sharp rises in river levels. A Flood Watch is in effect for all mountain-fed rivers in Western Washington and river forecasters warn that flooding could end up a little worse than it was this weekend.
There will likely be renewed urban and small stream flooding in the lowlands, and landslide risk remains high. To top it off a High Surf Advisory is on the coast for waves of 17-23 feet on Tuesday.

Rain and wind will calm down late Tuesday evening and we’ll be in a relative lull Wednesday morning. We have another round of light-to-moderate rain late Wednesday with highs near 50 but it’s a quick mover and is gone by daybreak Thursday. After that, a dry stretch! Long range models show dry weather Thursday through Saturday with just a few sprinkles on Sunday.

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT FOR THE PUGET SOUND REGION!

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT FOR THE PUGET SOUND REGION FROM THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE:

A STRONG PACIFIC STORM COULD BRING STRONG WINDS AND LOCALLY HEAVY RAIN TO WESTERN WASHINGTON ON SATURDAY. A MUCH STRONGER SYSTEM WILL IMPACT THE REGION ON SATURDAY. THIS SYSTEM HAS THE POTENTIAL TO BRING WINDS OF 20 TO 35 MPH WITH GUSTS OF 45 TO 50 MPH TO PARTS OF THE COAST. WINDS THIS STRONG USUALLY OCCUR IN FALL AND

WINTER. THUS, THIS WIND EVENT COULD CREATE MORE PROBLEMS DUE TO THE DECIDUOUS TREES STILL HAVING THEIR LEAVES. THIS WILL MAKE THE BRANCHES MORE PRONE TO SNAPPING IN STRONG WINDS. IN ADDITION TO THE POSSIBILITY OF DOWNED TREE LIMBS…THE GUSTY WINDS COULD CAUSE LOCAL POWER OUTAGES.

RAIN WILL BE LOCALLY HEAVY AT TIMES ON SATURDAY. RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 1 TO 3 INCHES ARE FORECAST FOR THE COAST AND IN THE MOUNTAINS…WITH A HALF TO ONE INCH ELSEWHERE…DURING THE 24 HOUR PERIOD ENDING AT 5 AM PDT SUNDAY. THIS AMOUNT OF RAIN WILL LIKELY END OR HELP REDUCE THE SIZE OF ANY ONGOING WILDFIRES.

IN ADDITION TO THE WIND AND RAIN…TEMPERATURES WILL BE BELOW NORMAL ON SATURDAY. HIGHS ARE FORECAST TO BE MAINLY IN THE MID TO UPPER 60S ACROSS THE LOWLANDS.

THOSE PLANNING OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES IN THE MOUNTAINS IN PARTICULAR THIS WEEKEND SHOULD PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE LATEST FORECASTS FROM THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE.
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SEATTLE

water customers to be more mindful of their water use…………………

NWCN

2 hrs ·

The cities of Seattle, Tacoma and Everett are asking water customers to be more mindful of their water use.

Water shortage concerns in Seattle, Tacoma, Everett

The cities are urging residents to be mindful of their water use as they implement stage one of their water shortage response plans.

NWCN.COM

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Water shortage concerns in Seattle, Tacoma, Everett

SEATTLE – The cities of Seattle, Tacoma and Everett are asking water customers to be more mindful of their water use. The cities have implemented stage one of their water storage response plans due to the hot, dry weather and low river levels.

Seattle and Everett say their water outlook is “fair” and they should have enough water supply into fall when rainfall typically replenishes the supply.

Seattle’s water supply covers the city along with 25 other cities and water districts in King County. Everett’s water supply serves 80 percent of Snohomish County.

Tacoma says its use of the Green River for summer water demands is being augmented with groundwater wells. It allows water stored from the river to be primarily dedicated to protecting fish.

Tacoma’s water supply serves Tacoma and several surrounding communities in Pierce and King counties.

The three cities are issuing an advisory, urging customers to take these steps to avoid wasting water.

  • Water before 8 a.m. or after 7 p.m., which reduces evaporation.
  • Watering deeply but infrequently. The cities say it’s better to have one or two deep watering’s rather than several shallow watering’s.
  • Fix any indoor or outdoor leaks at your home.
  • Look for silent toilet leaks: Put several drops of food coloring in your toilet tank. If you see color in your toilet bowl after ten minutes, you have a flapper leak.
  • Wash your vehicle at locations that recycle water.
  • Use a broom, not a hose, to clean sidewalks, driveways, and patios.
  • Wash full loads, not partial loads, in your washing machine.

woman saving a two year-old locked in a hot car

Temperatures for the central Plains could be as hot as 100 degrees this weekend! Watch this incredible video of a KS woman saving a two year-old locked in a hot car.



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Which Outdoor Activities Top the Charts for Lightning Perils??

AccuWeather.com

15 mins ·

So far this year, lightning has claimed the lives of 22 people. Here’s a list of leisure activities that top the list for lightning fatalities:

Which Outdoor Activities Top the Charts for Lightning Perils?

Each year, two-thirds of all lightning-related fatalities recorded in the United States occur when people are engaging in leisure activities.

ACCUWEATHER.COM

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Snohomish storm chaser gets 1-in-a-million shot of tornado, rainbow

By Scott Sistek Published: May 11, 2015 at 12:44 PM PDT Last Updated: May 11, 2015 at 5:01 PM PDT

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Tornado and rainbow during storm near Wiley, Colorado on May 8, 2015. (Photo: Benjamin Jurkovich)

Not sure I’ve ever seen a photograph that captures the beauty and power of weather in one singular shot.

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Snohomish’s Benjamin Jurkovich, part of the JWSevere Weather Chasing Team has been out storm chasing in the Midwest for the past few weeks and he’s had his share of twisters, super cells, and other images that define Tornado Alley in the spring.
But this one he got near Wiley, Colorado Saturday afternoon might be the most unique in his portfolio — a tornado at the same time as a rainbow.

“It was pretty darn awesome!” he said.
Jurkovich said most of his storm chases have been in the dusty Midwest as it hadn’t rained much, but the night before this photograph, that portion of Colorado had heavy rains, helping to clear the air for this spectacular shot.
Here is his full 12 minute video showing the spectacular tornado and rainbow:


It’s just one of many tornadoes Ben has found during his two week jaunt.


He’s been lucky so far in not having too many close calls – the one exception was while chasing a storm near Hayes, Kansas, another area of rotation began to develop to their southwest moving northeast:


They had to use a series of remote, dirt roads to escape and when they looked back, they found a low, “ground scraping” wall cloud rotating right over where they just were. No confirmed tornado there, but a dangerous spot to be in.

His favorite story though comes from Texas. He said someone followed him on Twitter from Texas Friday morning just out of the blue and later that day, there was a large supercell thunderstorm with rotation that was heading for the small town of Throckmorton in Texas. Jurkovich’s team was on the northwest side of that town and could see the storm begin to spin and an ominous wall cloud begin to emerge as it headed right for them. A tornado warning was issued by the National Weather Service, but Jurkovich noted no tornado sirens were going off in town. They contacted the sheriff’s office and moments later, the sirens went off.

A tornado did eventually form, but managed to just miss town by about a quarter mile.
After Ben Tweeted some of the videos and photos from the storm, he got a note from his newest Texas follower — it turns out Ben had been storm chasing right near his ranch, which was close to the spot of the tornado. ” ‘You kept my family safe today,’ ” Ben said the Tweet read. “That’s why I chase,” Ben said.

The man offered that if Ben was ever back in the area, to come by his cattle ranch and he’d fix him a nice steak. Ben said he just might be heading back to that part of Texas this week to meet up with him.
In all, Ben has put 9,000 miles on his car chasing around the Midwest. (I joked with him he’s probably the only storm chaser out there with Washington license plates!) He’s coming back home later this week, but I suspect it won’t be too long before he’s out there again.

In the meantime, Ben says he’s going to work on “storm chasing” on the West Coast, live streaming some of our infamous wind storms from the coast during the fall and winter. Maybe show off to the rest of the world that while the Northwest doesn’t have the supercell thunderstorms, we do have our own stormy weather to deal with. His team is also raising money to help severe weather warning efforts for small towns in Tornado Alley.



UPDATE: Make that “2 in a million” shot!
Turns out, Ben wasn’t the only Washington storm chaser who was at that storm in Colorado! Michael Snyder of Normandy Park was also there — apparently just down a dirt road a bit from Ben — and captured a similar photo:

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(Photo courtesy: Michael Snyder)

Snyder said he saw a total of four tornadoes in the same storm. Great photo! And… still can’t get my mind around the odds two Washington storm chasers would end up at nearly the same spot to get this amazing photo!




Power outages remain after Thursday night’s windstorm


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Photo by Kathy Doran

A tree lies on its side after being uprooted in Thursday night’s storm near the Mill Creek library.

Staff and Wire Reports

EVERETT — About 12,000 Snohomish County Public Utility District customers remained without power Friday afternoon after a windstorm blew through Western Washington.


Schools in the Everett and Stanwood-Camano districts canceled or delayed classes on some campuses that were left without power.


Forecasters expect a calmer weekend with some sunshine and a return next week to occasional rain showers and mountain snow.


Winds reached 49 mph Thursday night at Sea-Tac Airport, 62 mph at Paine Field in Everett and 69 at the Whidbey Island Naval Air Station.


Continued scattered outages were reported Friday in the areas of Paine Field, south Everett, Tulalip and Marysville, PUD spokesman Neil Neroutsos said. Outages peaked Thursday at about 50,000 customers, he said.


PUD brought on extra crews to help restore power, he said. Many of the outages were attributed to trees knocked down by winds.


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